As a developer, creating your own blog is one of the best projects you can add to your portfolio. Potential employees have tangible evidence of your credibility with real-world topics, languages and frameworks.

In this article, I’m going to share the 10 best developer blogs that you should visit to inspire your creativity. This list isn’t in any particular order and was curated not based on the insightful content written by the authors, but rather by the eye candy, custom elements and overall experience as a reader.

Let’s dive in!


Let’s make the JAMstack logo with CSS!

In this brief tutorial, you’ll learn how to create the JAMstack logo from scratch with CSS!

Here’s a pen showing the final result!

Thinking in shapes & setting up our variables

At first glance, this logo may look complex but it can actually be recreated with a few divs (it could probably be done with a single div, but that’s another article for another day). When considering how to tackle a piece like this, it’s best to break it up into shapes. What shapes do you see in this logo? I see a circle and several squares.


Cover photo by Roberto Nickson / Unsplash

It’s March 2021. It’s been a year since we were sent home to work. Reflecting over the past year, I realized how difficult this change has been for me. As an extrovert, I miss being with people. Working from home over the last 12 months has allowed me to notice that I feel more productive when I’m around other people and in a work environment.

Don’t get me wrong — it’s not that I’m lazy — I still get work done, I just don’t feel like I have the same energy as I do when I have to *go* to…


As developers, we spend the majority of our day in front of a computer screen writing code.

Eye fatigue (also known as Asthenopia) can be a serious issue and spending hours on end in the default VSCode setup can be tempting. While the out-of-the-box VSCode setup isn’t bad by any means, your eyes may thank you if you invest a bit of your time configuring your setup (not just the font, but the theme, too).

If you want to know what theme, font and extensions I use in VSCode, check out this article I wrote about it here!

In this…


Welcome to part three of the Uncommon HTML Tag series!

With each article in this series, I will introduce a widely unknown HTML tag, discuss compatibility across browsers and cover some real-world use cases with the element.

The < cite > Tag

The <cite></cite> tag is a semantic element that is used in conjunction with the <blockquote></blockquote> element to denote a referenced piece of work, such as a book, an essay, a film, a musical or even a tweet.

Many browsers style the content of a <cite></cite> element in italics by default.

Let’s take a look at how it’s used!

<blockquote> 
When…

The <kbd> tag

Welcome to part two of the Uncommon HTML Tag series!

With each article in this series, I will introduce a widely unknown HTML tag, discuss compatibility across browsers and cover some real-world use cases with the element.

The < kbd > Tag

The <kbd></kbd> tag defines user input on your document and, by default, uses the browser's monospace font for visual distinction.

While the most common use-case for using this tag is to denote keyboard input, it can also be used for input such as voice or other commands.

Let’s take a look at how it’s used!


There are a plethora of options when it comes to code editors, especially for front-end developers. I’ve tried Atom, Sublime Text, Webstorm — you name it. While each editor has its own strengths, I find myself coming back to VSCode purely for its level of customization.

2020 just wrapped up and I thought it would be interesting to cover my personal setup so you can take a look into how I work and so that I can look back at the end of 2021 and see what’s changed.

Let’s dive in!

Theme

Let’s start with the big one. There’s no lack…


The <progress> tag

Welcome to the first article in the Uncommon HTML Tags series! With each article in this series, I will introduce a widely unknown HTML tag, discuss compatibility across browsers and cover some real-world use cases with the element.

My hope is that each article broadens your understanding of HTML and helps you discover new tags.

The < progress > Tag

The <progress></progress> tag will create a progress bar and allow you to visualize the completion of a task. This could be handy for showing the progress completion of a multi-page feedback survey, for example!

Let’s take a look at how it’s used!


GameSalad

The No Code revolution is taking the internet by storm. Tools that don’t require previous coding knowledge opens up a new world to creative people who don’t have a Computer Science background!

I’ve seen a lot of articles cover various No Code tools specifically for web development — but I want to take a few minutes to talk about an application that allows you to build your own mobile games without writing a single line of code.

GameSalad turns game players into game creators. GameSalad’s powerful visual programming interface has powered thousands of games on the web and on Android…


In part two of this series, I want to continue the discussion of testing in isolation and briefly turn our attention to services.

While child-components are one type of dependency in a component, injected services are another type of dependency that must be mocked when writing unit tests.

Angular’s foundation is built on dependency injection and services allow us to extrapolate logic into classes that can be shared between components (or other services).

Creating & Injecting a Service

Using the Angular CLI, run the following command ng g s employees. …

Braydon Coyer

Front-End Specialist who likes to share his findings with the world.

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